Wood Kemble Donne Sands Hart Murray Trail

 


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Elijah Purdy and Sarah Hart

 




Husband Elijah Purdy



 
 Born: 
Christened: 
Died: 1813
 Buried: 
 
 Marriage: 



Wife Sarah Hart



 
 Born: 1760
 Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 



 
 Father: Joseph Hart (1727-1807)
 Mother: Elizabeth Gedney (1732-1830)





Children



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Stephen Hart and Martha Tompkins

 




Husband Stephen Hart



 
 Born: 
Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 



 
 Father: John Hart (1755-1840)
 Mother: Charity ? (1763-1839)



 
 Marriage: 



Wife Martha Tompkins



 
 Born: 
Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 



Children


1 M Morris T Hart



 
 Born: 
Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 
 




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John Roake and Susannah Hart

 




Husband John Roake



 
 Born: 
Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 
 
 Marriage: 1801



Wife Susannah Hart



 
 Born: 
Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 



 
 Father: Jonathan Hart (1744-1785)
 Mother: Elizabeth Bloomer (1751-1824)





Children



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Thomas Hart and Freeborn Williams

 




Husband Thomas Hart



 
 Born: 1642
 Christened: 
Died: 1671
 Buried: 



 
 Father: Edward Hart (Abt 1616-      )
 Mother: Margaret ? (Abt 1620-Abt 1671)



 
 Marriage: Abt 1661 - Newport, Newport, RI



Wife Freeborn Williams



 
 Born: 4 Oct 1635 - Salem, Essex Co, Massachusetts
 Christened: 
Died: 10 Dec 1709 - New Port, Rhode Island, NY
 Buried: - Clifton Burying Place, Golden Hill St., Newport, Rhode Island



 
 Father: Roger Williams (Abt 1602-Abt 1682)
 Mother: Mary Bernard (1609-1676)




 
 Other Spouse: Walter Clarke(1640-1714) - 6 Mar 1683 - Newport, Rhode Island



Children


1 M John Hart



 
 Born: 
Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 
 
 Spouse: Priscilla Gould (      -      )



2 M Thomas Hart Jr.



 
 Born: 
Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 
 



3 F Mary Williams Hart



 
 Born: 1663
 Christened: 
Died: 17 Sep 1710
 Buried: - Clifton Burying Place, Golden Hill St., Newport, Rhode Island
 
 Spouse: Samuel Cranston (1659-1727)
 Marr: 1683



4 M James Hart



 
 Born: 1666
 Christened: 
Died: 20 Jul 1693
 Buried: 
 
 Spouse: Mary Clarke (1670-      )
 
 Spouse: Francis Clarke (1673-1693)




General Notes: Husband - Thomas Hart


From John Osborn Austin, Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, p. 3 14-316: Thomas, d. 1671, m. Freeborn Williams, b. Oct 1635, d. 10 Ja n 1710, dau. of Roger & Mary Williams. Freeborn, m.(2) 6 Mar 1683 Walter Clarke. Thomas was a deputy to the General Assembly from Newport in 1666. On 4 Sep 1666, it was voted that a boat be procured and sent oit Warwick. Thomas was ordered to procure the boat and hands to go to Warwick. His will was made 22 Mar 1670 and probated 7 Aug 1671 in Newport. Overseers, friends Jireh Bull and Walter Clarke. He mentions wife Freeborne, eldest son John, daughter Mary Hart, sons James and Thomas, faother-in-law (i.e., step-father) John Gould, mother Margaret Gould). Children of Thomas & Freeborn (Williams) Hart: 1. John, m. Priscilla Gould, b. 20 Jun 1661, d. 23 Jan 1689, dau. of Daniel & Wait (Coggeshall) Gould. He was a Quaker. On 12 Jun 1685, he and wife Priscilla sold to Joseph Mowry of Jamestown, 4 acres at Jamestown. 2. Mary, b. 1663, d. 17 Sep 1710, m. Samuel Cranston, b. Aug 1659, d. 26 Apr 1727, son of John & Mary (Clark) Cranston. Children: Mary, John (b. 4 Aug 1684), James, Samuel, Thomas, Thomas (b. 1698), Hart (b. 1699). 3. James, b. 1666, d. 20 Jul 1693, m.(1) Mary Clarke, b. 11 Jan 1670, d. 11 Nov 1690, dau. of Weston & Mary (Easton) Clarke ; m.(2) Frances Clarke, b. 17 Jan 1673, d. 26 Jun 1693, dau. of Walter & Hannah (Scott) Clarke. It says he had no issue. He was a Quaker . His first wife died at her father Weston Clarke's. His second wife died with stillborn son. He died on ship Elizabeth, coming from Barbados. 4. Thomas. No information on him.


General Notes: Wife - Freeborn Williams


"The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island" by John Osborn Austin, Genealogical Pub. Co., Inc., Baltimore, MD, c1969, there you'll find the Edward/Thomas Hart/Freeborn Williams line: four generations


General Notes: Child - John Hart


From John Osborn Austin, Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, p. 3 14-316: 1. John, m. Priscilla Gould, b. 20 Jun 1661, d. 23 Jan 1689 , dau. of Daniel & Wait (Coggeshall) Gould. He was a Quaker. On 12 Jun 1685, he and wife Priscilla sold to Joseph Mowry of Jamestown, 4 acres at Jamestown.


General Notes: Child - Mary Williams Hart


From John Osborn Austin, Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, p. 3 14-316: Mary, b. 1663, d. 17 Sep 1710, m. Samuel Cranston, b. Aug 165 9, d. 26 Apr 1727, son of John & Mary (Clark) Cranston. Children: Mary, John (b. 4 Aug 1684), James, Samuel, Thomas, Thomas (b. 1698), Hart (b. 1699).


General Notes: Child - James Hart


From John Osborn Austin, Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, p. 3 14-316: James, b. 1666, d. 20 Jul 1693, m.(1) Mary Clarke, b. 11 Jan 1670, d. 11 Nov 1690, dau. of Weston & Mary (Easton) Clarke; m.(2) Frances Clarke, b. 17 Jan 1673, d. 26 Jun 1693, dau. of Walter & Hannah (Scott) Clarke. It says he had no issue. He was a Quaker. His first wife died at her father Weston Elizabeth, coming from Barbados Clarke's. His second wife died with stillborn son. He died on ship.

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William Hart and Julia Martling

 




Husband William Hart



 
 Born: 3 Sep 1799
 Christened: 
Died: 1828
 Buried: 



 
 Father: Elisha A. Hart (1765-1812)
 Mother: Mary Dutcher (      -      )



 
 Marriage: 



Wife Julia Martling



 
 Born: 
Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 



Children



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William Kennison Hart and Dosia Suiter

 




Husband William Kennison Hart



 
 Born: 24 Oct 1870 - Salem, Richardson Co, NE
 Christened: 
Died: 23 Sep 1954
 Buried: - Riverside Cemetary, Warsaw, Benton Co, MO



 
 Father: John Jay Hart (1841-1925)
 Mother: Alverda Virginia Kinnison (1844-1934)



 
 Marriage: 



Wife Dosia Suiter



 
 Born: 
Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 



Children



General Notes: Husband - William Kennison Hart


Reser Funeral Home in Warsaw confirmed that William K. and Samuel F. Hart are buried in Riverside Cem. Sam's son Harold is also there and it says "Beloved son of Samuel F. and Ella". I'm guessing that Harold never married and he may have been an only child so Sam's line would have died out with his death.
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William Monmouth Hart and Sarah Ogden

 




Husband William Monmouth Hart



 
 Born: 1690 - Rye, Westchester Co, NY
 Christened: 
Died: 1761 - Rye, Westchester Co, NY
 Buried: 



 
 Father: Jonathan Hart (1650-1711)
 Mother: Hannah Budd (1648-      )



 
 Marriage: 



Wife Sarah Ogden



 
 Born: 1694 - Fairfield, CT
 Christened: 27 Jan 1694 - per Internet
 Died: - Fairfield, CT
 Buried: 



Children


1 M Monmouth Hart



 
 Born: 1727 - Rye, Westchester Co, NY
 Christened: 
Died: 1786 - White Plains, Westchester Co, NY
 Buried: 
 
 Spouse: Rachel Bloomer (      -      )



2 M Joseph Hart



 
 Born: 15 Jan 1727 - NY
 Christened: 
Died: 1807
 Buried: 
 
 Spouse: Elizabeth Gedney (1732-1830)



3 F Anna Hart



 
 Born: 11 Apr 1728 - NY
 Christened: 
Died: 26 Feb 1814
 Buried: 
 
 Spouse: John Guion (1724-1792)
 Marr: 15 Apr 1747



4 F Sarah Hart



 
 Born: Abt 1735
 Christened: 
Died: 1806
 Buried: 
 
 Spouse: Christopher Eisenhart (      -      )



5 M James Hart



 
 Born: 1740 - Rye, Westchester Co, NY
 Christened: 
Died: 1783 - Rye, Westchester Co, NY
 Buried: 
 
 Spouse: Rebecca Gedney (1732-      )




General Notes: Husband - William Monmouth Hart


Will of (William) Monmouth Hart: I, Monmouth Hart, of the town of Rye , in Westchester County, being of perfect mind. I leave to my wife Sarah the use of the house where I now dwell (except one room for my son James). Also the use of 1/3 of all lands on Budd's Neck, and the profit of my right in Rye Ferry, And 2 beds, and my Great Chair, and 2 cows. I leave to my son Joseph all that parcel of land which I purchased of Thomas Merritt, lying in the White Plains. Also my sword and belt and my ivory headed cane. I leave to my son Monmouth Hart, a certain parcel of land in the White Plains, on the east and south side of the road and adjoining the lands of Elijah Purdy, Daniel Ferris , and Samuel Haight. Also my right in the Rye Ferry after my wife's death. Also the sword that he commonly wears. I leave to my youngest son, James, all that my lot, dwelling house, and all lands, meadows and sedges thereto belonging, and the use of the room where he now dwells until the death of my wife, and then the said room to go to my eldest daughter Sarah "so long as she pleases to dwell in it". I also leave him my guns. I leave to my daughter Sarah the bond from Mr. John Smith, dated February 14, 1746, also a bed. I leave to my youngest daughter, Anna, wife of John Guion, a bed and furniture. If there is a surplus of movable estate after payment of debts and funeral charges, it is to go to my wife and daughters. And I make my wife and 3 sons executors. Witnesses: Henry Griffin, Joseph Coon. Proved September 26 , 1761. Monmouth Hart and Sarah Ogdon had the following children: + 14 i. Joseph Hart was born 15 Jan 1726. + 15 ii. Monmouth Hart was born Abt 1727. 16 iii. Sarah Hart was born Abt 173 5. 17 iv. Anna Hart was born in NY Abt 1736. She married John Guion. 18 v. James Hart was born in NY Abt 1740. From "Wills of Early Residents of Weschester Co. NY" pg 356- " # 668 James Hart, Rye Neck- Leaves to daughters Lavinia, Charity, Elizabeth, Jean and Heste r, 1/3 of estate, and to sons James, Elisha and Jacob the other 2/3. Mentions "brother in law John Guion. Dated May 1, 1781, Prove d May 20, 1783" William Monmouth Hart. Source of name from Westchester Co Historical Society, data from MacKenzie's "Families of the Colonial Town of Philipsburg". Photocopied pages are available from: Westchester County Historical Society 2199 Saw Mill River R d Elmsford, NY 10523 914 592 4323 --------------- Sources for the name William Monmouth; First, on Page 685 of Scharf's History of Westchester County, there is a history of the Presbyterian Church in Rye. One of those signing a petition to the Governor and Council of Connecticut requesting aid for the building of a church in the town in 1727 was William Monmouth Hart. Also, William Monmouth was listed as one of Jonathan's (2) children in the book "Edward Hart and Allied Descendants" by Clara Hart Kennedy, published 1939. See, also, "History of Rye" by Charles W. Baird (1871) pg. 411.


General Notes: Child - Monmouth Hart


MONMOUTH HART (b. 1727 d. 1786), son of William Monmouth Hart and Sarah Ogden Abstracts of Wills, Vol XIV, 1786-1796 Page 407.--October 2, 1786. MONMOUTH HART, of White Plains, Westchester County, New York, to my wife Rachel, her heirs forever, my negro woman, Silvia, one horse, two cows, two beds and furniture to them, her side saddle, and bridle and linen that is made use of in my family; to my son Abraham, his heirs forever, one mare and one cow; my executors to sell all the remainder of my movable estate remaining on the farm; the moneys so arising I give to my daughters, Hannah Purdy, Mary Ann Bishop, 20 each; to my daughter, Rachel Fowler, 60, for her use and benefit, and also pay and discharge for all my funeral charges and doctor's bill; all the money still remaining in the hands of my executors shall be equally divided between my wife and my son Robert; if my wife die or marry, the last-named legacy be returned to my estate, and equally divided among my sons, James, Robert, and Abraham; all the bonds, notes, and book debts due to me, to my wife and son Robert, and to their use; that is to the use of my son Robert forever his half, and the other half to the use of my wife while she remains my widow; after that period to be equally divided among my sons, James, Robert, and Abraham; to my son James, his heirs forever, all the land I purchased of Joshua Carhartt, Isaac Meritt, and Samuel Purdy, as by the several deeds from them will appear; to my son Robert, his heirs forever, my dwelling house and all the lands lying on the east side of the road which I purchased of Robert Travis, as by his deed may appear, he at the same time allowing his mother the privilege of living in the common dwelling room, with the use of the northwest bedroom, as long as she remains my widow; Also pasture for her two cows and horse; to my son Abraham, his heirs forever, all the lands given me by my father, Monmouth Hart, lying on the south side of the road opposite my dwelling house; my son Abraham to allow my wife the privilege of ten loads of wood and four loads of hay yearly while she remains my widow. I owe sundry notes and bonds to different persons, and I order my sons, James and Abraham, discharge the same, James paying 200, and Abraham paying all the remainder of such debts being due unto Joseph Hart, Joshua Carhartt, Monmouth Purdy, and Ezekiel Bishop. My executors are to sell all my lands lying and being in Cortlandt Manor, purchased of Elisha Covert and Bartholomew Gedney (executors to the last will of John Gedney); the money arising from such sale, first I give to my grandchildren, the children of my son Jonathan, deceased, 310, to be equally divided among them; my executors to put the 310 out at interest, and interest so arising to be paid to my daughter-in-law, Elizabeth Bloomer , for her taking care and bringing up my said grand-children; my executors to pay to each of my grand-children as follows: To the sons, their proportion as they come to the age of twenty-one years, and the daughters as they arrive at the age of eighteen years of age in succession; if either of the children die before reaching lawful age, the share of the one so dying to be equally divided among the survivors. Al l the remainder of the money arising from the sale of lands n Cortlandt Manor I give to my sons, James and Abraham, their heirs forever, James receiving one third and Abraham two thirds of that sum; my son James pay one third of all the expenses, and my son Abraham two thirds of the penses of proving my will and the charges of the executors about settling my estate; the money in my hands be applied towards paying the present taxes. I release my son James from the 100 sum I loaned him; to my sons, James, Robert, and Abraham, their heirs forever, all my privileges in Rye Ferry granted to me by my father, Monmouth Hart, deceased. I appoint my wife and my sons, James, Robert, and Abraham, executors. Witnesses, Abraham Hatfield, yeoman; Ebenezer Purdy, Isaac Sniffen. Proved, January 4, 1787. Monmouth was reported to be a tenant farmer at Philipsburgh Manor. (? per page 109 of CHK) Monmouth Hart (and his brother Joseph) were, at some point, loyal to the British rule over the American Colonies as evidenced by their signatures on the following document; Many families were split in their alligiances in the early days of the Revolutionary War my families were split in their loyalty to the Crown. The following is taken from "History of Westchester County, New York," Vol. 11. page 584: This day ( March 28, 1775 was a memorable one in the history not only of White Plains, but of Westchester County. Public notice had geen given of a meeting of persons from different districts of the county to consider the most proper method of taking the sense of the freeholders of the county upon the expediency of choosing deputies to meet the deputies from other counties for the purpose of electing delegates to represent this colony in the General Congress to be held in Philadelphia on the 10th day of May then next. A few days after this meeting, a protest, bearing date the 13th of April, 1775, signed with over three hundred names, appeared in "Rivington's New York Gazette," in which it was stated that on the 11th of April the friends of government met at the house of Captain Hatfield, and at about twelve o'clock walked to the court house, where they found the other company collected in a body; that the friends of the government then declared that they had been called together for an unlawful purpose, and they would not contest the matter with the others by a poll, but that they came only with a dexign to protest against all such disorderly proceedings, and to show their detestation of all unlawful committees and congresses; that then, giving three huzzas, they returned to Captain Hatfield's singing as they went, "God Save Great George, Our King;" after which, the following protest was drawn up and signed: We, the subscribers, freeholders and inhabitants of the County of Westchester, having assembled at White Plains in consequence of certain advertisements, do now declare our honest abhorrence of all unlawful Congresses and Committees, and that we are determined, at the hazard of our lives and properties, to support the King and constitution, and that we acknowledge no representatives but the General Assembly, to whose wisdome we submit the guardianship of our rights and privileges. The following names appended to this declaration show that the Tory faction of White Plains was well represented: "J. P. Horton, Daniel Oakley, William Davis , William Anderson, Captain Abraham Hatfield, Gilbert Horton, Joshua Gedney, John Hyatt, Nehemiah Tompkins, Bartholomew Gedney, Isaac Purdy, Elijah Purdy, Gilvert Hatfield, Gabriel Purdy, Thomas Merritt, Joh Gedney, ----Monmouth Hart----, Timothy Purdy, Thomas Baker, Elijah Miller, William Baker, Jr., Samuel Purdy, James Kniffin, -----Joseph Hart----," etc. It is interesting to note that Monmouth's son Jonathan fought on the side of the Patriots in 1776.


General Notes: Child - Joseph Hart


Joseph resided on Mamaroneck Ave in White Plains until some time after 1790, when he removed to Greenburgh where he died in 1807.


General Notes: Child - Anna Hart


Anna had 11 children only 2 are known at this time.


General Notes: Child - James Hart


James Hart was born in NY Abt 1740. From "Wills of Early Residents of Weschester Co. NY" pg 356- " # 668 James Hart, Rye Neck- Leaves to daughters Lavinia, Charity, Elizabeth, Jean and Hester, 1/3 of estate, and to sons James, Elisha and Jacob the other 2/3. Mentions "brother in law John Guion. Dated May 1, 1781, Proved May 20, 1783" Ref . "Early Wills of Westchester County, New York, from 1664 to 1784" by William S. Pelletreau, A.M. publisher is Francis P. Harper, NY 189 8 ___________________ Abstracts of Wills, Vol XII, 1782-1784 From The New York Historical Society Collections, this 1903 volume featrues abstracts of wills on file in the Surrogates Office, City of New York, from 6/17/1782 to 9/11/1784. Bibliographic Information: Abstracts of Wills Volume XII 1782-1784, The New York Historical Society, 1903. Pag e 86.--In the name of God, Amen. I, JAMES HART, yeoman, of Rye Neck, Westchester County, being very sick and weak in body. I leave to Liveniah, Charity, Elizabeth, Jean and Hester, each, one bed with the bedding; likewise, a third part of my estate equally divided amongst the above five girls. Unto my sons, James, Elisha and Jacob, the two thirds of my estate in like manner. The stock and all the utensils to be kept till Jacob is of age for the children's use. The house, barn and fences to be kept in good repair until that time; then all the chattels and utensils to be sold, and divided among the above named eight children. I make my brother-in-law, John Guion; James, my oldest son ; and Charity, my daughter, executors. Dated May 1, 1781. Witnesses, David Bloomer, of Westchester County; Abraham Guion; and Benjamin McConnell, of Westchester County. Proved, May 20, 1783. James Hart will

See the entry for his daughter, Jane's step father in law, William Sutton, as to the location of his farm on Budd's Neck.
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Alanson Hartpence

 




Husband Alanson Hartpence



 
 Born: 
Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 
 
 Marriage: 



Wife



 
 Born: 
Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 



Children


1 F Mary Morton Hartpence



 
 Born: 
Christened: 
Died: 24 Jul 1896 - London, England
 Buried: 
 
 Spouse: Mahlon Day Sands (1842-1888)
 Marr: 18 Sep 1872 - Newport, RI




General Notes: Child - Mary Morton Hartpence


neice of Levi P. Morton, Governor of NY and Vice President of the U.S.
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Mahlon Day Sands and Mary Morton Hartpence

 




Husband Mahlon Day Sands



 
 Born: 1 Mar 1842 - New York City
 Christened: 
Died: 7 May 1888 - London, England
 Buried: 



 
 Father: Abraham B. Sands (1815-1861)
 Mother: Sarah A. Day (Abt 1816-1906)



 
 Marriage: 18 Sep 1872 - Newport, RI

 
 Other Spouse: Edith Minturn(1844-Abt 1870)

Events

1. Occupation: Partner in A.B. Sands & Co. druggists and chemists.




Wife Mary Morton Hartpence



 
 Born: 
Christened: 
Died: 24 Jul 1896 - London, England
 Buried: 



 
 Father: Alanson Hartpence (      -      )
 Mother: 





Children


1 M Mahlon Alan Sands



 
 Born: 
Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 
 
 Spouse: Evelyn Blight (      -      )
 Marr: 11 Oct 1906 - Newport, RI



2 M Morton Harcourt Sands



 
 Born: Abt 1886
 Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 
 




General Notes: Wife - Mary Morton Hartpence


neice of Levi P. Morton, Governor of NY and Vice President of the U.S.
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Edward Wood and Susanna Harvey

 




Husband Edward Wood



 


 
 Born: 1604 1
 Christened: 28 Feb 1604
 Died: Mar 1667
 Buried: 20 Mar 1667 - St. Dunstan's, East London



 
 Father: Nicholas Wood (1565-Abt 1646)
 Mother: Anne Ferrour (      -1648)



 
 Marriage: 

Events

1. Event: 1660.




Wife Susanna Harvey



 
 Born: 
Christened: 
Died: 1652
 Buried: - St. Dunstan's, East London



Children


1 F Susannah Wood



 
 Born: 1636
 Christened: 19 Jun 1636
 Died: 
Buried: 4 Oct 1638
 



2 M Edward Wood



 
 Born: 1637
 Christened: 29 Oct 1637
 Died: 
Buried: 
 



3 M John Wood



 
 Born: 1639
 Christened: 26 Nov 1639
 Died: 
Buried: 8 Dec 1639
 



4 M Nicholas Wood



 
 Born: 1640
 Christened: 24 Jan 1640
 Died: 
Buried: 29 Aug 1641
 



5 F UNKNOWN Wood



 
 Born: 
Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 
 



6 F UNKNOWN Wood



 
 Born: 
Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 
 



7 F UNKNOWN Wood



 
 Born: 
Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 
 



8 M Thomas Wood



 
 Born: 4 May 1641
 Christened: 
Died: Abt 1723
 Buried: 14 Jun 1723 - Littleton
 
 Spouse: Dorothy Dicer (      -1704)
 Marr: 3 Jul 1666




General Notes: Husband - Edward Wood


He became tenant of Littleton Manor in 1619. He also acquired the ruined but historically significant Middleham Castle, County York, in 1662 . According to a summary of papers in the London Metroplitan Archives , "Edward Wood was born in Suffolk c. 1604 (Will: PCC.Carr 83) and came to London some time before 1634 when the Burial Register of St. Dunstan's in the East has an entry for an unbaptised child of his. From 1636 onwards there is a steady flow of entries for the baptisms and burials of his children, Susanna, Edward, John, Nicholas and Thomas. Of these, only Thomas survived infancy. Further evidence of Edward's early years in London is sparse. According to "The Inabitants of London in 1638" (an edition of MS 272 at Lambeth Palace Library), he was living in Thames Street in 1638.

Then there have survived among the family papers two account sheets for money collected by Edward Wood for Fairfax's army 1647- 9 in the St . Dunstan'S in the East and Billingsgate area. (WFP.H) In 1657 he was an Alderman for Billingsgate Ward, and he was on the Committee of the East India Company 1655-7 (Beaven: "The Alderman of London"). In his will, dated 1658, Edward describes himself as Citizen and Grocer of London (PCC.CARR 83).

It seems probable that Edward Wood's London residence was the house in Thames Street, later occupied by his business partners and agents, John Pack and Joseph Stapley. He was certainly familiar with the house in 1663, and still stayed there on his visits to London. In a letter dated 5th September, 1665, instructing Pack to shut up the house and flee from the plague he wrote, "remove my two trunkes, the one goinge in to my chamber and the other by my beds side... . In my Closet are the Keyes of all the Chests. In the Cyprus chest in my Chamber is a Long Guilt Cupp." (262/43/58)

Many of the surviving letters sent by Edward Wood to John Pack are endorsed with an address. The earliest, dated 4th September, 1663, has "For Mr John Pack, these, in Thames St." (WFP.H) Another, dated 18th October, 1663, gives more information: "For Mr John Pack at the Signe of the Shipp over against beare key in Thames St." (262/43/7), and on a letter dated 26th October: "For Mr John Pack at the signe of the shipp in Thames (sic) neere the Costome house." (262/43/8) It might be supposed that Pack merely collected the letters from the Ship Inn and did not necessarily live close at hand. However, some Assessments at the Guildhall Corporation Record Office clearly show that the house was in Tower Ward in "Bear Key Precinct", off Thames Street. In the 1663 subsidy list there is the name of Edward Wood alone. In the 1663/4 Militia Tax there are the names of Edward Wood, Joseph (sic) Pack and Joseph " Stapli", bracketed together as "Partners". In the 1671 subsidy the names of John Pack and Joseph Stapley appear alone.

Edward Wood was still living in London in December 1659, since in the negotiations with Nicholas Townley the elder for the purchase of property called "Ipwells" or the "White House" in Littleton he was doubtful about a clause leasing back the house to Townley for four years, saying, "for anything I know, may be forced to hyer a house my selfe for have thoughts of leaving London." (262/43/17) He was still in London in April, 1662 when a bond includes a clause for the repayment of the loan to Edward "att his now dwelling house in Thames Street in London." (262/43/113) In all the surviving deeds of his earliest purchases in Littleton and Laleha m his name appears as "Edward Wood of London" from 1660 until as late as April 1664. (928/15/2,4,& 5; 262/34/30)

The earliest reference to Edward Wood actually living in the Littleton area is a Gamekeeper's Licence dated 2nd May, 1663 (WFP.H). The first surviving letter written from Edward Wood at Littleton to John Pack is dated 4th September, 1663 (262/43/1). This is in fact the beginning of a good series of letters. Between 4th September, 1663 and 26th March, 1665/6 a total of 112 letters sent by Edward Wood to Pack have survived. (262/43/1-105; 262/35/22-24: WFP.H) There are also two letters within this period sent by Edward's son, Thomas Wood, to John Pack, dated October 12th, 1663 and 10th July, 1665 (WFP.H). A further two letters sent by John Pack to Edward Wood have survived dated 28th June, 1666 and 15th June, 1665 (WFP.H) [See chart on page XI] All these letters were between Littleton and London, and concerned both business matters in London and domestic requirements at Littleton. They were often conveyed by John Loton's barge. The correspondence was apparently quite regular and it seems that both Edward Wood and John Pack sent two letters each per week. In 1665, when this was disrupted by the plague , Edward wrote that two of his letters had been returned although he had received Pack's "Tuesday letter" and "Frydayes letter" (262/43/47) . Pack frequently sent domestic goods down to Littleton by John Loton and on occasion quite valuable pieces of plate, sums of cash, etc. On at least one occasion, one of Edward's sisters travelled down to Littleton by Loton's barge (262/43/39).

It is clear from the letters that Edward Wood was engaged in building at Littleton during the period approximately October, 1663 to June, 1665. In a letter dated 3rd December he specifically mentioned that he was building (262/43/12), and his other letters include orders for building materials such as timber, nails, pantiles, lime, etc. On 28th March, 1664 he requests "scaffolding ropes" (262/43/32 & 3) and on 29th December, 1663 instructs Pack to pay the Wharfinger of Bear Key 5 "for the plummer for work donn at Litleton." (262/43/16) On 14th April, 1 664 he asks Pack to enquire "the honest price of Slit deales such as ar fitt to board the out side of a stable or barne." (262/43/34) In May , 1665 he asks Pack to send down the Glazier and Joiner "for I would fayne have my house finished". (262/43/38) He obviously felt bound to supervise the building himself and gave this as his reason for not coming up to London in June, 1665 (262/34/21). In another letter in the same month he writes, "I have men and women at worke three or four and twenty at least", and requests some Suffolk cheese "for breakfast meale for my workmen". (262/43/41) As late as November, 1665 Wood mentions in a letter to Robert Dicer that his house is "a ruinous place in re spect of the times that I could not finish nor furnish it". (262/34/13 4)

In addition to this information derived from Edward's letters to John Pack there have survived depositions by Aron Dies of Clerkenwell, Bricklayer, and Thomas Laurence of St. Brides, London, Labourer, that they were employed by Edward Wood in bricklaying work at Littleton and Laleham from the beginning of August to the end of October, 1663. (262/3 4/28) There has also survived an Award, dated 1st May, 1661 by which Edward Wood agreed to pay quitrents on his property in Littleton, and in return was allowed by Gilbert Lambell, the Lord of the Manor, "soe much brick earth upon that part of the common of Littleton...as may make five hundred thousand of bricks", and the right to have a kiln there . (262/34/5 and 928/9/1) These bricks may well have been used to build Edward Wood's mansion at Littleton. It was apparently quite a large house. There are several later references to it as a "mansion" and the 1664 Hearth Tax for Littleton shows that Edward Wood was assessed for sixteen fire hearths.

It seems, therefore, that Edward Wood moved down to Littleton during 1663, possibly as early as August, but certainly by the beginning of September. There he built a large new mansion for himself and his family . It is tempting to think that the first letters that have survived from Edward Wood to John Pack were in fact the first letters sent, and were occasioned by Edward's removal from London.

Edward apparently started to farm his land at Littleton immediately on arrival. In one of the first letters to Pack that have survived, dated 14th October, 1663 he asks him to get "a brand to marke sheepe E.W . (262/43/1), and on 28th October, enough iron to "shoe a payre of Cart Wheeles." (262/43/4) On 2nd November he requested "20 fathum of white rope of this size of the straw in the letter, for plowraces." (262/4 3/5) Orders for oats and "pease" are a recurrent item in the letters, and were used for fodder for cattle. On 29th February, 1663/4 Edward requested "50 or 60 cash "as I have much business here as cowes, horses, and seeds, barley and teares to buy besids my building." (262/43/2 7) In March, 1663/4 he ways "my sowing of pease and tares is soe that I cannot be absent." (262/43/29) In the following summer he asked Pack to send down 10 cash to pay the harvest men (262/43/48). Edward Wood, Citizen and Merchant of London had apparently decided to become a gentleman farmer.

He still retained, however, his business connections in London. Probably between 1660 and 1663 he came to some arrangement with John Pack and Joseph Stapley that they should occupy his London house after he left for Littleton, and should act as his partners and agents in London. In his will, written in January, 1658/9, Edward describes John Pack as "my late servant" (i.e. former servant) and appoints him as one of his executors. Probably Pack was already an occupant of the house in Thames Street at the date that Edward moved to Littleton, and simply took over the management of all Edward Wood's affairs in London.

There are several references in the letters to "the partable account" which was the joint account of John Pack, Joseph Stapley and Edward Wood. In a letter dated 8th February, 1663/4 Edward writes with regard to a loan to a Dr. Turner, "if you and Joseph thinke fitt to let him have it out of the partable account I am contented to adventure my halfe part." (262/43/24) From this it seems that Edward had a half share, and Pack and Stapley a quarter share each in the account. In another letter dated 7th August, 1665 he suggested that the penalty clause in an indenture should be "double what our Stock is, which you and Joseph knowes best what it is, which I leave to you to put in the wrightinge. " (262/43/52) Edward Wood also had an account of his own, which was kept at London in the care of John Pack. In a letter dated 5th September , 1665 he urged Pack to shut up the house and flee the plague. Among his other instructions he wrote, "pray putt upp all my wrightings in my closett and all them in your closett below and all my bookes and the bookes which belong to the partable account into a sack and seale them upp and leave them at my Cozen alsoe. As for what moneys you have in the house which concern the partable account I pray dispose of it as you shall thinke fitt." (262/43/58)

It is difficult to tell from the letters what was the purpose of the joint account. Loans and mortgages to friends and acquaintances both from the joint account and Wood's own account seem to have been very frequent, but a remark in one of Edward Wood's letters suggests that this was not regarded as desirable. Concerning Nicholas Townley he said, "I thinke I shall never be quitt of hime and others for borrowing money." (262/43/38) He must have profited considerably from the loans he made, however, since he charged high interest rates. On one occasion at least he charged 6% interest on a bond for repayment in twelve months. (262/43/88) There are also clear indications that some of the capital was invested, as for example, with the East India Company. (262/43/ 54 & 61)

It seems also that the three partners may well have been concerned in some sort of rope business. The house in Thames Street was either attached to or very near a warehouse and shop. In September, 1665 Edward Wood advised Pack to "keepe the shopp dores shutt" and "tis better to loose the warehouse rent than to hazard your health." (262/43/63) In August 1665 Edward refers to "the spinning upp the hempe at ould Gravell Lane" and suggests that for safety's sake Pack should lock it up together with the yarn. (262/43/52) There is also a reference to "our workemen" (262/43/52). Other evidence is supplied by a letter from J.S. ( Joseph Stapley) to Henry Leigh of Boston with regard to a shipment of "Marline" or double stranded rope, and another letter from William Greene dated 24th August, 1665 (WFP.H). Finally, an undated letter from Mr Dingley to Thomas Wood is endorsed, "To be left at Mr Pack's a rope shop." (WFP.H)

Edward Wood died in March, 1666/7 and was buried at St. Dunstan's in the East on March 20 th. (Parish Register) Among the family papers has survived a printed invitation to the funeral: "by Eight or Nine of the Clock in the Morning, by reason that the Corps is to be carried to London that day." (WFP.H) There is also a list of 102 names, written in John Pack's handwriting, headed, "The names of those that are to be invited to the funerall on 20th March, 1666." (WFP.H) This is endorsed with a further list of twenty-three names headed, "Ringes to be provided for the persons hereunder mentioned." This list includes both John Pack and Joseph Stapley.

It seems surprising that Edward Wood was buried in London at St. Dunstan's, when this church had been partly destroyed by the Fire of London , and when Edward's last years had been devoted to building a new mansion in the country and acquiring land in that area. In his will, however, he shows that his main motive was a desire to be buried with his wife who had died in 1652. He left 50 to the poor of the parish of St . Dunstan's provided "that I may have at an indifferent vallue the same vault for a burying place for my selfe and family where my late deceased wife lyeth interred." He mentions elsewhere that this was "the new vault in the South Chappell" but it is important to note that this will was drawn up in 1658, before the Fire.

The relationship between John Pack and Edward Wood is difficult to assess. Edward's letters are definitely businesslike in character and usually consist almost entirely of orders for goods to be sent and errands to be done. Pack may have been a "partner" but to Edward he was still the former servant, as he described him in his will of 1658. On the other hand, Pack was obviously trusted completely by Wood. All his money and deeds were kept in chests in the London house, and probably also the "plate and jewells" mentioned in his will.

One definitely gets the impression from the letters that Edward Wood was a rather hard man, close-fisted and dominated by the profit motive . In his letters to Pack no small detail of weight or price is too trivial for his attention.

It is interesting to note that John Pack held land in Suffolk. Is it mere coincidence that Edward Wood was himself born in Suffolk, and that both Edward Wood's and John Pack's families seem to have been living in Norfolk at the beginning of the seventeenth century?

Edward Wood, made his fortune during the Interregnum but did not suffer from the Restoration when he set himself up as a wealthy landowner in Middlesex."


General Notes: Child - Thomas Wood


According to the current owner, Shepperton Studios, Littleton Park was built by Thomas in 1689 and designed by Christopher Wren. However, the summaries of papers held in the London Metropolitan Archives make clear that Thomas' father, Edward, built a large manor house in Littleton between 1663 and 1665. It is unclear from the summaries as to whether this is the current manor house or a predecessor. Thomas was a Ranger of Hampton Court (1664-1723).

The summaries of the papers held in the London Archives have the following to say about Thomas and his relationship with his father, Edward : "The family letters and papers also reveal much of Thomas Wood, son of Edward Wood. In 1663 when he first appears in the letters, he was only aged twenty-one, and in fact his father made provision for his minority in his will dated 1658. The negotiations for his marriage to Dorothy Dicer in 1666 are clearly reflected. (262/43/44 - 7) Apparently both sides endeavoured to strike a good bargain, and this caused some bitterness. In a letter dated 15th June, 1665 Edward wrote, "my son's affections are much towards Sir Robert Dicer's daughter" but by July the question of a settlement was already in dispute. In a letter dated 17th July, Edward protested indignantly to Pack, "you do wright that Sir Robert Dicer thinkes I keepe my sonn too hardly to it. I know not what he meanes by it unles he thinkes tis I stand for soe much money for his daughter's portion. Tell him I ever gave my sonn that liberty to please himselfe both as to person and portion." (262/43/47) The marriage actually took place on 3rd June, 1666 at St. Dunstan's. (Parish Register) The couple seem to have lived at Littleton with Edward Wood from the beginning. Considerable care was taken over some tapestry hangings purchased from Mr Cox the Upholsterer, who made a visit to Littleton and apparently gave his advice. When it came to the point, however , Edward was unwilling to pay the bill and asked Pack to suggest to Lady Dicer that she pay for them. "You may tell her that I have and must lay out uppon the house soe much money that I am unwilling to lay ou t 100 uppon the hangings". (262/43/101).

Glimpses of the household at Littleton from 1666 until 1704 when Dorothy Dicer died are revealed in various family letters and papers, but particularly in the letters of Stephen Penton, Principal of Wadham College, Oxford, and a close friend of Thomas Wood. In a letter dated September, 19th, 1689 he wrote, "of all places in the world I guess I could bee most Easy att your house where a man hath leav to love and bee beloved in his own way, where Curtesy is not starch'd and stiffened with Formality and a man is not forc'd to go to Dancinge Schoole a month before he Enters the threshold." (WFP.H)

One of the chief problems in the management of the house-hold was undoubtedly that of servants. John Pack knew someone called "Dutch Sarah" who provided several maids and servants for Littleton. Pack wrote in a letter dated February 3rd, 1681/2, "Dutch Sarah saith she hath now a Couple of little prittey likely Chamber maids...and they say they can doe well as to dressinge, raisinge paste etc." (WFP.H) A rather desperate letter has survived written from Dorothy Wood to John Pack, undated: "I woold desier you to speke to the Duch wooman to helpe me to a cook maid for I think that wich shee helped me to last hath ben mad." (WFP.H) Other cook maids also presented a problem. In a letter dated 30th June, 1684 Thomas Wood wrote, "The Cook Maid came here on Saturday night but she hath got a great Cough" and "appeares to be very infirme and sickly." (WFP.H) John Westley, a friend, wrote to Dorothy Wood , in another undated letter, "I make it my business to enquire oute a Silent Cooke maid which I suppose is a rarity in the house." (WFP.H) It seems as though other friends also helped to find servants. Dorothy Spencer, for example, wrote in a letter of 3rd February, 1681/2 recomm encing a housekeeper, "a stayed sivell well conditioned body that hath knowledge in all things that pertaine to a good huswife ...and one that can preserve, conserve etc. and is well skilled in making all manner of sweetmeats and the like for pastery." (WFP.H)

There are also a number of letters sent to Thomas Wood from his sons Robert and Edward at Eton, and subsequently at Oxford. The earliest of these is dated 21st July, 1687 when Edward was seventeen and Robert fifteen years old. (WFP.H) On August 18th Robert wrote home requesting a study... "it is an ungrateful object to me to have my books lye in a confused manner upon my Chamber table." (WFP.H.) His request was apparently satisfied, since in a letter dated 1687 Edward explained that their candle consumption has risen since my Brother has had a study." (WFP.H) Edward went up to Oxford in 1680 and his tutor there, Charles Whiting, made several reports on his progress. On Christmas Eve, 1688 he wrote, "he has shown himself publickly in the Hallsince he came by a speech made before the whole house and he quitted himself very handsomely." (WFP.H) A letter from Edward dated March, 31st, 1689 gives an interesting account of his current debts, including payments to a Bedmaker 6/-; Tutor 2 guineas; 31/6d "for a new set of maps"; chamber rent 16/6d. and books and shoes 20/-. (WFP.H) At this date Edward was receiving an allowance of 80 per annum. Robert also sent accounts to his father later, and it must be presumed that Thomas kept a close check on the expenditure of both his sons.

Thomas Wood, Edward's son, seems to have been on closer terms with Pack. In a letter dated 10th July, 1665, Thomas agreed to be his Executor but said "at the Reading of thy letter and writeing to the now my tears stand in my eyes." (WFP.H) Thomas also asked Pack to stand as Godfather to his son, born in 1683 (WFP.H) (April 30th). In his reply Pack wrote.... "were it onely your request I should not deny it you, therefore for want or in stead of a better I shall, God permittinge, stand a wittenes to answer for your younge sonne, be it of what name so ever that you please to give him." (WFP.H) This reply seems again to be that of a servant rather than an equal, and this is underlined by Pack 's own note, added to an Account Sheet, August 1683, sent to Thomas Wood: "This first Account sent to my Master." (WFP.H)"

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Sources


1 Summary of Papers in London Metropolitan Archives, ACC/0262.


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